Hamas and Hezbollah: Strategic Coordination in the Face of Conflict

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2023-12-05 | 00:46
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Hamas and Hezbollah: Strategic Coordination in the Face of Conflict
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6min
Hamas and Hezbollah: Strategic Coordination in the Face of Conflict

 How does the Hamas movement interact with Hezbollah's engagement pattern in the war across the southern front? Are there any distinctions in their approaches regarding the required level of participation, or are they on the same wavelength?

During the initial stages of the Israeli aggression on the Gaza Strip, there might have been a push from the enthusiastic elements within Hamas, especially those outside the occupied territories, to anticipate full engagement from Hezbollah in the conflict. 
 
Consequently, there were expectations that the Southern Front would open wide, leading to the declaration of a major war seemingly overnight.
 
However, Hezbollah avoided heading in this direction, which is irreversible, after losing the element of surprise and deception. This element was the primary reason for the remarkable success of the "Al-Aqsa Flood" operation on October 7th. 
 
Yet, this same factor led to the flip side, waking up the enemy and putting it on full alert on the northern front with Lebanon, complicating any strategic calculations or attack plans.
 
Faced with the evolving situation after October 7th, Hezbollah, unable to suffice with verbal solidarity with Gaza, "innovated" a calculated battle against Israeli occupation at the southern border. 
 
This battle aimed to achieve, on one hand, attrition and occupation of a significant portion of its military capabilities. On the other hand, it aimed to prevent Lebanon from sliding into a comprehensive war, unless imposed by the Israeli entity due to miscalculations. In such a case, Hezbollah would prove its readiness for such an escalation.
 
As time passed and the results of this strategy began to emerge, the level of satisfaction and reassurance within the leadership of Hamas increased. This culminated in a special expression of gratitude to the resistance in Lebanon, voiced by Abu Ubaida, the military spokesperson for the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades, and Ismail Haniyeh, the head of the political bureau. This move thwarted attempts to exploit the situation.
 
A leadership source in Hamas confirms that what Hezbollah is doing on the southern borders with occupied Palestine, providing support to the people of Gaza and their resistance, and defending Lebanon against Israeli attacks, is "highly appreciated" by them. The source considers Hezbollah as outlining an exemplary equation on the borders that aligns with the requirements of the current stage.
 
The leader emphasizes that the course taken in the confrontation, along with the resilience of Hamas and all Palestinian resistance factions, does not necessarily dictate that Hezbollah must now initiate the long-anticipated major war. 
 
He points out that the goal is not to burn stages under the pressure of emotions, stating, "Any comprehensive confrontation should fall within the framework of decisive war, not just a battle within wars." He adds, "We don't treat Hezbollah as if it's another party; rather when we meet, we make a joint assessment based on the understanding that we and Hezbollah are one in the confrontation, not two separate entities."
 
The Hamas leader underscores that Hezbollah is "sincere and earnest in its support for us." He argues that if Hezbollah were selfishly driven by national affiliations, it would not have intervened at all. Instead, it has once again proven its commitment to the Palestinian cause, as demonstrated by the significant number of martyrs on the path to Jerusalem, including leadership figures and the son of a Shura Council member and the head of the 'Loyalty to the Resistance' Bloc.

The leader considers it inaccurate to claim that the axis of resistance did not come to Gaza's aid and that the "battlefield unity" has not been achieved to a certain extent. 
 
He points out that Hezbollah fought alone in 2006 and Hamas fought alone in 2014. 
 
However, in this confrontation, there is genuine coordination between the various theaters of the resistance for the first time. This is evident in the launching of the Southern Front battle, the operations conducted by Iraqi resistance against US positions in Syria and Iraq, the attacks by Ansar Allah in Yemen with missiles and drones, and their interception of ships in the Bab el-Mandeb strait. 
 
Additionally, there is an unprecedented Iranian diplomatic movement in the region, reflected in the tours of Foreign Minister Hussein Amir Abdullahian, aiming to align with the axis of resistance and counterbalance the visits of US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who supports the Israeli entity politically and militarily.
 
 
The leader points out that those who exaggerate their support for the resistance due to narrow political interests do not concern them, and they are not prepared to engage in discussions with them. As for the sincere supporters who were expecting more from the party due to genuine hopes placed on it, they should know that Hezbollah has not fallen short in line with the requirements of the current confrontation.
 
 
 

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